Delphi Archeological Museum

This morning, I woke up early to catch a bus to Delphi. Waking up was not especially difficult, since I was in an eight-bed dorm at the Zorbas hostel, and people kept getting up throughout the night to catch a wee-hours ferry to this or that island. So I was not exactly asleep to begin with.

The hardest part of the trip was getting to Bus Station B in Athens (Metro to Attiki, then take any bus four stops to the Liossion street terminal; the trick was figuring out which direction to take the bus in). From there, I caught the 0730 bus, which went to Delphi.

I did not want to return to Athens, so I found a cheap single room for the night in Delphi. (This turned out to be a really good idea, since the last bus back to Athens leaves before 1700, and it was lovely exploring the archeological site in the evening after everyone else had left).

Delphi came strongly recommended by a friend, and I was given explicit instructions regarding what to look for. My first stop (per instructions) was the Archeological Museum, which has a combined ticket with the actual site.

The museum tells the story of the three temples to Apollo at the site, each built after the destruction of the previous one. Sculptural decoration has survived from all the temples, so there are artifacts with which to create the narrative. The museum also contains other artifacts found at Delphi. Here are some of the things I found interesting.

Here is a cauldron on a tripod:

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Here are twin statues of Kleobis and Biton.

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Various Greek city-states would give offerings to Delphi, often in an attempt to garner some sort of favor. One of the offerings from Naxos was this sphinx, which originally sat upon a column approximately 12 m in height.

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These blocks were from the wall of the Athenian treasury. On them is inscribed a hymn to Apollo, along with musical notation. The item description claims that this is the earliest known notation of a melody. I am guessing that the symbols above the text represent the melody (it did not mention this specifically).

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These are two pieces of the "column of the dancers." (The figures at the top were thought to be in dance-like poses).

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This omphalos (naval) may or may not have rested atop the column.

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Here is a sleeping Eros.

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This is a statue of the youth Antinoos, known for his beauty and favored by the Roman emperor Hadrian. There are statues of him everywhere.

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This is the famous bronze statue of a charioteer.

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After leaving the museum, I headed up to the town to have lunch. The souvlaki pita I had at this place is the best I have had in my life (some French Canadian tourists I met there said found it on the advice of a guidebook, so I am not alone in my opinion). I am not sure what the name of the place is since it's not clear from the exterior, but from the museum, walk to the town, then up the hill past the bus station, and you will see it on your right.

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The tzatziki sauce contained lots of garlic and dill, which was extra yummy. 

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By Ross in Travel on Thu 26 June 2014. Tags: Greece, museums

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