More Monasteries

After leaving Agia Trias, I set out to hike around the area and explore some other monasteries.

Here is the monastery of Agios Stefanos (St. Stephen). A seemingly endless line of tour buses was pulling up to the monastery, so I elected to enjoy it from a distance:

Untitled photo Untitled photo

Next, I stopped at Rousanu, which is a nunnery. I overheard from one of the tour guides that it has the most residents of any of the Meteora monasteries.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

It has a beautiful garden.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

It also has a barnacle porch. Note the ladder on the wall below the porch.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

This is a nice spot to relax and enjoy the view.

Untitled photo

Here is one fresco from the chapel depicting the martyrdom of various saints, complete with detached heads and everything.

Untitled photo

Finally, a photo of Rousanu in the distance, with the rock cliffs of Meteora as a backdrop.

Untitled photo

The next stop on the monastery tour was Varlaam.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

Here I am outside the monastery (the one in the background is the monastery of Grand Meteoron).

Untitled photo

In the monastery, there is a really huge barrel.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

You can see the traditional and modern goods delivery systems side by side. Here is the traditional winch and net:

Untitled photo Untitled photo

And here is the modern version. The net has been replaced by a metal box, which you can see on the valley floor. The metal cart is also on wheels, and can move back and forth on a short set of rails.

Untitled photo Untitled photo
Untitled photo

On my way out, I met two canine caretakers:

Untitled photo Untitled photo

And one feline.

Untitled photo

Finally, I visited the largest of the monasteries, the monastery of Great Meteoron.

Untitled photo

The path up the the monastery involves many sets of stairs, and on one occasion passes through a narrow tunnel. I got a nice view of Varlaam through the tunnel.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

It has for the most part been turned into a museum, and there are exhibits on Greek history and folklife, liturgical objects, and manuscripts. More interesting than these were the rooms which were set up the way they would have been in the nineteenth century.

This is the storeroom:

Untitled photo

With closeups of wine casks, barrels, and presses:

Untitled photo Untitled photo

Here is the ossuary.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

And the kitchen. You can see the food preparation area and the cookpot:

Untitled photo Untitled photo
Untitled photo Untitled photo

Here is the balcony outside the kitchen:

Untitled photo

I like these photos taken through the balcony railing and supports.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

After leaving Great Meteora, I still had several hours of daylight left, so I decided to take quick hike down one of the numerous trails in the area. I stumbled across this mysterious staue (the Greek inscription was mostly eroded).

Untitled photo

I also found an abandoned monastery.

Untitled photo Untitled photo

I walked up the stairs leading up to it, but the door was barred.


By Ross in Travel on Sat 28 June 2014. Tags: Greece, churches

Comments

comments powered by Disqus